00:/ at World Architecture Festival

November 11, 2009

00:/ were invited to take part in the Less Does More exhibition at the World Architecture Festival last week and presented this animation on the Right to Build project accompanied by the following manifesto:

Less does more

We are in a period of systemic change – the current crisis, like that of the 1930s, is simply the crystallisation of an ongoing transition between an old world and a new one. Symptoms of this transition which may be heralded by a new age of austerity, include the threat of peak oil, the need to mitigate our carbon emissions, the wholesale contraction of consumer credit, and the massive pressure for the reduction of public spending.

This moment creates a fundamental choice for our civilisation – a choice to build a world where were we unpick the work of a century through demolishing the middle classes and radically polarising society between the few have and many have-nots or to use this scarcity of resource as the catalyst to create a new foundation to our economy. The first choice leads us to a particular place where democracy itself is threatened and we begin a great socio-economic unwinding. The alternative choice is routed in a more sophisticated formulation of capitalism based upon use value and the accounting of externalities; a new, sharing economy. We are already seeing the seeds of such a future in social innovations from car clubs to co-working environments where we share the cost and opportunity afforded by an asset, or in films such The Age of Stupid which are funded via crowd sourcing with both the investment and return being shared, or institutions such as the HUB built via micro bonds, or examples like community co-build housing in Tübingen-Südstadt. Together these and hundreds, even thousands, of other small scale civil ventures are starting to build a viable alternative to the less is less for the majority and slowly offering a real alternative for our cities, our notion of possession, and our collective being.

This nascent future has fundamental repercussions for place-shapers and place makers. These new interventions suggest a new taxonomy of architecture where the propositional skills of change-making in a city are no longer limited to creating buildings but to new ways of creating shared places as genuinely shared assets through their design as open platforms working across communities, markets, institutions, & environments.

In addition, Indy took part in a seminar on Thursday morning with Cezary Bednarski & Roger Zogolovitch to “Examine how a particular architectural type (housing) fits within, takes advantage of and serves a particular social context, in both developing and developed worlds.

  • Exploring how a radically rethink of approach to the typology of housing can create asset revenue and social value
  • Tapping the social, economic and physical resources of a particular place
  • Designing economic security and benefit into the building”

Do you still think we’re as safe as houses? Do you think there is a future in our right to build as an alternative way of building our homes and communities?

AF

Advertisements

One Response to “00:/ at World Architecture Festival”

  1. Ralf Lippold Says:

    … rethinking reality and creating the new out of it.

    It is like redoing your home, getting the old things out, clean up the walls and floors – and start all over again to a fresh and open beginning.

    Buildings can be used and provided in the normal fashion, providing everything the proprietor thinks the user could use and benefit from. Or the other way round: ask your potential client who would like to move into the building to take actively part in the creation.

    Then most often less will be more, and everybody will win in the end, even the owner who gets happy clients who tell their friends, clients and supporters of that cool place.

    Looking forward to nice stories. Perhaps there even already exists blog or book on that, where people share their experiences what has worked for them.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: